&&&

My name is Fallon
and I am a graphic designer.

This is where I keep my inspiration. And sometimes to do lists.

Christian Patterson  //  Redheaded Peckerhood, 2005-2011

Redheaded Peckerwood is a work with a tragic underlying narrative – the story of 19-year-old Charles Starkweather and 14-year-old Caril Ann Fugate who murdered ten people, including Fugate’s family, during a three-day killing spree across Nebraska to the point of their capture in Douglas, Wyoming. The images record places and things central to the story, depict ideas inspired by it, and capture other moments and discoveries along the way.

From a technical perspective, the photographs incorporate and reference the techniques of photojournalism, forensic photography, image appropriation, reenactment and documentary landscape photography. On a conceptual level, they deal with a charged landscape and play with a photographic representation and truth as the work deconstructs a pre-existing narrative.

Redheaded Peckerwood also utilizes and plays with a pre-existing archive of material, deliberately mixing fact and fiction, past and present, myth and reality as it presents, expands and re-presents the various facts and theories surrounding this story.

While photographs are the heart of this work, they are the complemented and informed by documents and objects that belonged to the killers and their victims – including a map, poem, confession letter, stuffed animal, hood ornament and various other items, in several cases, these materials are discoveries first made by the artist and presented here for the first time.

In book form, the work is presented as a sort of visual crime dossier, including pieces of paper which are inserted into the book. The many individual pieces included serve as cues and clues within the visual puzzle. In this way, there are connections that are left for the viewer to be made and mysteries that are left to be solved.

Redheaded Peckerwood is Christian Patterson’s second monograph and was awarded the 2012 Arles Rencontres Author Book Award.

(Source: darksilenceinsuburbia)

4 days ago with 379 notes
A group portrait of female punk and new wave musicians in London, August 1980, L-R (back) Debbie Harry of Blondie, Viv Albertine of The Slits, Siouxsie Sioux of Siouxsie And The Banshees, (Front) Chrissie Hynde of The Pretenders, Poly Styrene of X-Ray Spex, and Pauline Black of The Selecter.

A group portrait of female punk and new wave musicians in London, August 1980, L-R (back) Debbie Harry of Blondie, Viv Albertine of The Slits, Siouxsie Sioux of Siouxsie And The Banshees, (Front) Chrissie Hynde of The Pretenders, Poly Styrene of X-Ray Spex, and Pauline Black of The Selecter.

(Source: theremina, via misandryad)

6 days ago with 6257 notes
"I discovered The Silent Woman, Janet Malcolm’s portrait of Sylvia Plath and Ted Hughes, last fall and read it in just one sitting, the book in one hand and a champagne flute of white wine in the other. I had recently broken all of my wine glasses. I did not break them all at the same time. Some I broke while cleaning, and I was upset that I had managed to destroy something while trying to make it clean, make it better. Other glasses were broken using more theatrical methods, smashing them against walls to prove points. I had also recently broken my bed frame, cracked a rib, and wrecked a series of valuable relationships. Broken things had become my metric. It was fall and this book fell on my head in the Strand. It was fall and everything was falling out of place. It was fall and I felt, constantly, as if I were in a state of vertigo. I could go on. I won’t."
6 days ago with 1 note
vancity604778kid:

"Sorry" means something different in Canada than it does in other places.


In Canada, if something bad happens and you say sorry, it means “I acknowledge that you have been inconvenienced or otherwise harmed, and I am expressing sympathy. I’d prefer it if the bad thing had not happened.”
We apologize for things constantly.
"Sorry I’m late, traffic was horrible!" Sorry about the traffic.
"Ugh, I think I caught the flu!" Sorry you have the flu. That must be unpleasant.
"My house was burglarized and everything of value stolen!" Oh wow, I’m sorry. That’s a terrible experience.
And so on. It’s rude not to apologize, because failing to apologize suggests you do not care.
There is even commercials up here in Canada about how we Canadians like to apologize for everything.
Sorry.



I use “sorry” like a Canadian, apparently. If I had a dime for every time someone responds with “It’s not your fault! Why are you apologizing?”

vancity604778kid:

"Sorry" means something different in Canada than it does in other places.

In Canada, if something bad happens and you say sorry, it means “I acknowledge that you have been inconvenienced or otherwise harmed, and I am expressing sympathy. I’d prefer it if the bad thing had not happened.”

We apologize for things constantly.

"Sorry I’m late, traffic was horrible!"
Sorry about the traffic.

"Ugh, I think I caught the flu!"
Sorry you have the flu. That must be unpleasant.

"My house was burglarized and everything of value stolen!"
Oh wow, I’m sorry. That’s a terrible experience.

And so on. It’s rude not to apologize, because failing to apologize suggests you do not care.

There is even commercials up here in Canada about how we Canadians like to apologize for everything.

Sorry.

I use “sorry” like a Canadian, apparently. If I had a dime for every time someone responds with “It’s not your fault! Why are you apologizing?”

(Source: ultrafacts, via ultrafacts)

6 days ago with 23615 notes